University towns see large prices increases in last 3 years

Average property prices in the UK’s top 50 university cities, based on the Guardian’s latest university league table, have risen by more than 27%, or £66,000, in the past three years, according to fresh research

According to Housesimple, 60% of the cities ranked in the top 50 have seen home prices rise by an average of more thann £20,000, which could go some way towards contributing towards helping parents pay the £27,000 tuition fees many students on a three-year degree graduating this year have had to pay.

HouseSimple claims to have identified university cities where parents could buy a second home or buy-to-let for their child to live in while they are studying, and the house price growth over the duration of their three-year degree could potentially cover at least part of the cost of tuition.

The research looked at how local property markets have performed since 2013 to calculate potential price growth over the next three years, for students starting university in September, although there is little evidence to suggest that the rate of home price growth recorded over the past three years will be repeated over the next three years. The research also fails to take capital gains tax in to consider. along with estate agent fees.

In the table below, HouseSimple has looked at university cities with average house prices below the UK average – and which of the Top 50 university cities have the lowest prices, and also where price growth since 2013 is more than £20,000, enough to cover at least two-thirds of the tuition fees on a three-year degree, excluding tax implications and selling fees.

University & Area

Potential increase in house prices over next three years based on growth since 2013

Current average house price, based on Land Registry House Price Index data  

Manchester

£30,108

£147,700

Coventry

£26,625

£153,926

Birmingham

£42,697

£156,153

Aston (Birmingham)

£42,697

£156,153

UAE (Norwich)

£36,185

£182,114

Portsmouth

£35,284

£185,365

Southampton

£36,520

£188,140

Cardiff

£31,599

£188,251

Loughborough

£30,542

£193,606

York

£42,697

£229,881

Top of the class is Queen’s University, Belfast, where current average prices are just £110,042, making property cheap enough for parents to buy a second home, and house price growth over the next three years, based on price rises since 2013, could be just under £21,000 (£20,766).

University & Area

Potential increase in house prices over next three years based on growth since 2013

Current average house price based on Land Registry House Price Index data 

Queen’s (Belfast)

£20,766

£110,042

Nottingham

£21,340

£120,474

Leicester

£21,917

£144,118

Sheffield

£20,226

£145,470

Manchester

£30,108

£147,700

Coventry

£26,625

£153,926

Birmingham

£42,697

£156,153

Aston (Birmingham)

£42,697

£156,153

Alex Gosling, CEO of HouseSimple.com, said: “It’s hardly surprising that young people are thinking twice about heading off to university when they’re faced with a £27,000 headache that they have to pay back. But for those parents fortunate enough to be able to afford a second property, there could be a way to give your offspring a debt-free start in life, depending on where they go to university.

“There’s a good chance parents of undergraduates will be expected to help cover the cost of rent, tuition or both. By investing in a second home, your child won’t have to pay living costs, as the rent will cover that, and the increase in capital value could cover the cost of tuition fees.”


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Written by: Houseladder